Accession cards

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    Identity of Food and the Vendor

    Bruno to vendor: Are you a Moor?

    Vendor: “I am a Pulaar (ethnic group from Senegal) sir, and I am from Lao Air. You can't read? It's nevertheless well written on my beautiful stove! - - aere lao cité baratal fouta toro.  ... I know this way of preparing meat better than the Moors. It is a job, like any other, that does not belong to any ethnic group."

    Rice Play Song (1)

    This is a play song from Kokrajar, Assam, India. Elders enact this with the children. The rough translation of the song is:

    Rice cook … cook… cook…

    Curry cook … cook… cook

    Will you eat … will you eat … will you eat?

    Keep for dinner also okay?

     

    Lets go to plant rice now

    Let’s make alli now

    Let’s break alli

    Let’s plant plant

     

    Now let’s go to catch crabs from the holes

    No way this side…no way that side… what about this side jogo…jogo…jogo!

    Inter-Community Dialogue Around Rice: From Kokrajhar Workshop

    The Kokrajhar workshop on rice revealed how urbanization and ‘modern’ non-agricultural lifestyle is putting pressure on the practice of rice cultivation. The space for transmitting indigenous knowledge system is shrinking and rice as a site of knowledge and meaning is being challenged, though it continues to be the main staple in the region. With growing number of younger people migrating to urban areas looking for job opportunities and the gradual spread of urbanization process, the biggest challenge is how to sustain productivitity.

    The Future of Luntaya Acheik Design

    I interviewed one of the weavers about the customer preferences in the design of luntaya acheik .

    I want to weave this design (as shown in the pictures) but I don’t do it. I don’t weave this design because the customers don’t like it. If I make it then I will have to sell it at a discount. But some customers from abroad often order older or traditional designs like this.

    A Lemon for €1

    Lemon is a fruit and a small shrub that grows 5 to 10 meters high. It has many benefits, culinary and therapeutic. I like to squeeze a lemon daily when I take tea. On my visit to Leiden, The Netherlands, I bought a lemon at a Saturday Market – one lemon for one Euro - in July 2019.

    “A lemon for one Euro” -  It was a high price but it made me think about the two different worlds – one in the south, Mali, where I live and a developing region, and the other in the north- the developed region.

    Cycling Shades of Chennai

    Simi Mariya Thomas, Research Scholar, MIDS, selected a photograph from the exhibition, Ambedkar Nagar- Near Kakkan Bridge, Chennai, to write her story for the session on Reading/Writing/Re-writing/Telling/Re-telling using prompts, 20 December 2019.

    Superwomen of Chennai always surprise and excite me. They design their life in a manner in which they are fully involved into some sort of activities around the clock.

    Disappearing Aura

    Simi Mariya Thomas, Research Scholar, MIDS, re-imagined an article circulated as pre-workshop reading in context of her work for the session Reading/Writing/Re-writing/Telling/Re-telling using prompts, 20 December 2019.

    The temporary aura of Kannagi statue, in Chennai, which was visible during its installation as well as disappearance made me think about the current media culture.

    Different? Not really

    The two women are as different as chalk and cheese. And I don't mean in terms of skin colour alone. Their appearance distinctly identifies them from two different regions of India - Northeast and South. They speak different languages and cook and eat food vastly different. But they are one - as women, as mothers as sisters in arms. They are united in their strength in the face of adversity. Migration, resettlement and subsistence bring them together in this space. Each is invisible, marginalised and discriminated against - be it colour, caste or communal identity.

    The Emerald Green Scarf

    Vinitha Jayaprakasan, Research Assistant, Centre for Community Knowledge, Ambedkar University Delhi wrote The Emerald Green Scarf as part of the workshop session on Reading/Writing/Re-writing/Telling/Re-telling using prompts, 20 December 2019.

    Who Am I?

    Cheryl Jacob, Coordinator (content & curriculum design) wrote Who am I? for the session on Day 2:Reading/Writing/Re-writing/Telling/Re-telling using prompts, 20 December 2019.

    Who am I? I am free. I am free to flow, free in nature. I take the state that nature gives me. In your hands I am turned into something that nature, perhaps, did not intended me for. But then who knows.

    Imaginations of a Street

    Mesha Murali, Senior Research Assistant, Centre for Community Knowledge, Ambedkar University Delhi, for her story took inspiration from all the exhibited photos for the session on Reading/Writing/Re-writing/Telling/Re-telling using prompts, 20 December 2019.

    I saw people sitting on the street, outside their houses, talking, eating and enjoying the passing day. Children were playing games, laughing, dancing to music and being asked by their parents to stay at a safe distance from the main street.

    The Blue Belt

    Surajit Sarkar, Centre for Community Knowledge, Ambedkar University Delhi wrote The blue belt for the session on Day 2: Reading/Writing/Re-writing/Telling/Re-telling using prompts, 20 December 2019.

    Reading ‘Recipes for Re-enchantment’ allowed a reinterpretation of my ‘Blue Canvas Belt’, which I bought last month after waiting for something like it since 2015.

    Dust

    Nini Lungalang is an important voice in Naga poetry. She taught English and classical music in Northfield School, Kohima, Nagaland. In the poem Dust, she voices the experiences of numerous Naga brothers and sisters who have lost their lives. 

    Photographs as Memory Triggers

    Photographs have proven to be interesting tools to get people to open up about themselves and share memories of their past. For instance, the photo of Anwar posing at Phasi Ghar (execution point) not only got him talking about the monument that no longer stands, but also reminded him of his childhood spent dressing up and posing for photographs at various locations in Mehrauli, Delhi.

    Mesha Murali: Bus stand se aage. Kahan?  

    Getting Ready for School?

    Aarti Kawlra selected a photograph from the exhibition, Ambedkar Nagar- Near Kakkan Bridge, Chennai, to write her story for the session on Reading/Writing/Re-writing/Telling/Re-telling using prompts,  20 December 2019.

    Cloth as Vehicle of Malian Crisis

    This large cotton boubou, well sewn, shows one of the designs that reflect the Malian crisis. The product comes from Douentza (located in the 5th region of Mali). The elements seen on the boubou illustrate the proliferation of the crisis. Each element is in the form of a hook and the two small dashes from top to bottom to show the continuation of the chain. The arrangement of the design forms a chain of problems.

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