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    Time in the craft

    “ Pronck” is one of the brewing company in Leiden, Netherlands, which was founded in 2014. Today we have Benjamin, one of the founder, who was a tax lawyer before guided us. His love and enthusiasm toward beer inspired him to start the brewery without the background of brewing ancestors, but with his university friends. 

    To Image Blue Through Making: Preparation Vat of Indigo in School

    Many of us may have seen or bought indigo products from market. Seldom do we have the privilege to explore the beauty and hardship of a craftsmanship, know the process and knowledge of it from school. For the semester of Spring 2019, there is a course "Blue Across Boarders", which provided students a brief understanding of indigo, from plants, process of making indigo dye to dyeing, also provided them a chance to witness the process and experimented with dyeing by themselves in school. 

    Sub-Theme Discussion in the Course 'Blue Across Borders'

    As for the semester of Spring 2019, some changes were made such as the adoption of theme-based group discussion. The students were divided into four discussion groups on (1) language and memory, (2) landscape and place, (3) gender and labour, and (4) market and aesthetics. These four sub-themes were adopted in the HaB methodologies workshop in in October 2018. This new trial helped to open up viewpoints based on cultural and historical understandings acquired in the previous stage.

    Indigo as Pedagogy

    Starting 2012, the TNUA Centre for Traditional Arts (CTA) initiated a series of field courses, including indigenous boat making, bark cloth making, banana fiber crafts, ritual parades etc.; the course of ‘Natural Dyeing’ was one of them. These courses aimed to bring students out of the classroom to learn from the soil and different people who give life to traditional arts, and to learn how traditional arts are related to the society and their generation. The 2013 course of ‘Natural Dyeing’, conducted with many partners, was divided into three main stages.

    Indigo: The Center of ‘Locality’

    Similar in many other places in the world, natural dyeing in Taiwan disappeared when the synthetic dye was widely distributed. Taiwan underwent fast modernization during the Japanese colonial period (1895-1945) that was also when Taiwanese indigo dye production and dyeing went down the lane. As a massive amount of Japanese machine-printed textiles entered the Taiwanese market, local dyeing workshops quickly shut down or turned into dealer shops of ready-made textiles. Since then, Taiwan indigo industry, once prevailing, now only existed in the memory of the elders.

     

    Walking the Naga Day

    Walking the Naga Day on 10 January is where memory and meaning meet for the contemporary Naga . It is also the first time that conscientious Nagas decided to create this event in a public forum to awaken every Naga's idea of home and the community. 

     

    It brings together  the voices, visions and many aspirations of the community as they straddle the borders of peace and conflict , of work and ethics, of construction and destruction, of harmony and violence as they go forth with the promise of a new year into a more stable future  .

     

    Reflection Through Learning Body and Environmental Knowledge

    Traditional handicrafts are a kind of embodied local knowledge, so does indigo. On the course of "Blue Across Boarders", students had a chance to talk with artisan Tang Wen-chun (湯文君), who is also an educator, motivator and researcher on indigo. Tang introduced the plants of indigo which are harvested in her farm, the practice she was conducting on also the process and tips for harvesting plants of indigo. Students had a field visit to the farm that grows the plants of indigo dye.

    Rice Varieties

    One of the items on display at most of the local Autonomous Council sponsored/organized exhibitions at BTC areas of Assam is different varieties of rice seeds, including indigous and hybrid ones. The main target is to create awareness of hybrid varieties of rice but what it does is also make aundience realize the invisibility of indigenous varieties.

    Luntaya acheik: The Making of Myanmar's Traditional Dress

    In the first figure, the governors of Myanmar are being awarded the cloth as a mark of honour. Luntaya acheik was the sacred cloth of the ancient Myanmar royals. But under the colonial rule everyone could wear this acheik.

    To know the preferences of the people of Myanmar better, the governemnt conducted a survey after which the acheik became the national costume.

    Family and women: Leiden and Mali

    The family is a social institution. It is beautiful to see a mother and her children together because it reflects the natural love and the affectability that exists between her and her offsprings. In Leiden, the parental concept is very visible in the streets because it is found that the parents and their children are at the edge of a bicycle (the parents and their children: case where all drive together; the case where the mother also pilot alone). Education is one of the priorities of the population of this city of the Netherlands.

    A Tour to Bio Science Park

    Leiden Bio Science Park was founded in 1984 at the west of the Leiden Central Train Station which is the largest and fastest growing science assemblage in the Leiden. The 2km wide campus include housings, university, hospital, restaurants, sports center, business companies and many other more. In the photo, it mentions the model of Bio Science Park which is proposed to be set up as the lively campus.

    Comparing street markets: Myanmar and Leiden

    The Saturday Market opens every Saturday along the canals (Nieuwe Rijn, Vismarkt en Botermarkt) and a smaller one on Wednesdays. There are many makeshift stalls on Saturdays but fewer on Wednesdays. The stalls sell - flowers, bags, toys, foods/ drinks , accessories (bicycle, tailor, fashion etc), speciality food like Middle East cuisine/ ingredients, Dutch herring, chesses etc. The stalls are always busy.

    Meeting with the Community Members about Trash

    We had a discussion with village leaders about putting trash systematically in our field visit. We gave them some dustbins to implement this. Our discussion focused on whether the villagers knew how to put trash systematically, and if we could get their permission to share our knowledge with the children of their village.

    Weaving luntaya acheik (1): Modernising Traditional Craft Practice

    The Saunders Weaving and Vocational Institute (SWVI) is situated in Yay-twin-nyi-naung ward, Lay-su quarter, Amarapura Township, Mandalay Region on the side of Mandalay-Sagaing road.

    Till 1910, the local weavers used the hand throwing loom which could weave 24 inches only. When Mr. L. H. Saunders, Judicial Commissioner of Upper Burma, found that the technology of hand loom in Myanmar was old, he introduced in 1910, a fly shuttle loom used in England.

    Place-based pedagogies, University of Mandalay (4)

    In order to link the classroom with the real world for the course of Urban Anthropology, our department decided to interact with the community elders to find out about the Taunghtaman Village Tract. 

    Our group met the village head and community elders of Taunghtaman Village in the village administrator’s office. The elders shared that nowadays most school children who grow up in Taungthaman do not know much about their home village and don't cherish it; and because of this, they are forgetting their cultural heritage.

    A Man for Peace: Reverend Dr Wati Aier

    "I think we were too fast with it all. Perhaps it was World War II that shaped the Naga soul. People come of age or in the process of coming of age, I think, in many ways we have been too idealistic. Instead of trying to work towards national construction, we were caught up in idealistic nationalism and I think traces of that idealistic mission still linger on today especially among the older generations... but the younger minds are beginning to be very critical and analytical at the same time, so I wish that the Naga movement began today.

    Tattoos and Patriarchy

    For the Konyaks, tattoos are associated with traditional customs and culture which have their own distinct origin and significance and are called Huhtu or tatu in their language. The word ta means body, tu means to prick and ‘huh’ means ‘thorn’, which translates to pricking the body with thorns. The word huhtu is more commonly used among the Konyak Nagas over tatu.

    Traditional House with Bamboo Matting in Htan Taw Village

    The housing pattern is usually with bamboo matting in Htan Taw Village. The people in Htan Taw village depend mostly on natural products like this kind of bamboo matting for their housing pattern rather than artificial products. On the other hand, in contrast, these kinds of natural products are more perishable than artificial. They have to cope with this problem with their intuition. Some of them apply emulsion paint, oil rust and the substance that drive the insects away on these bamboo mattings to protect the roof from insects and the climate condition.

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