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    Monitoring 'Suspected' Covid-19 Infected Individuals

    A hovering drone being used to keep track of 'suspected' infected persons as they wait for their turn to be checked and processed, Nizamuddin, New Delhi, India. Standing in a line are members of a religious assembly awaiting testing and quarantine processing, who came from across India and Asia. This continued after lockdown started, and appeals to authorities to assist in evacuation initially did not get any response .

    Rice, Women and Local Economy: Rethinking Covid-19 Consequences

    The images are from Kokrajhar Town bi- weekly market. Every Thursday and Sunday people living in and around the District Headquarter of Kokrajhar in the BTC (Bodo Territorial Council) area visit the main market when the bi-weekly bazaar takes place. The bazaar is a huge affair where assorted items are sold and bought, and contribute to the local economy. From direct producers-to-middlemen-to-whole salers of innumerable products partake in the commercial exchanges here. There are dedicated lanes and by-lanes within the market area for different items sold.

    Staying in

    “I barricaded myself and stared out the window, without seeing anything but my own unhappiness.”
                                                                                     ― Thomas Bernhard, The Loser

    Independence and Freedoms

    The whole Naga struggle, it is purely because of the invasion by India...this here is our land, this is ours. The coming of the English language too has given us new terms to describe us, including the word “indigenous” which itself is a way of saying that we are under India and it distorted our definition of who we are. After the British invasion, India too thought of us as a weak people and that it has a sense of ownership over us that led to the making of the state. It was an opportunity for Nehru to show a backup plan by giving us statehood which we didn’t ask for.

    Migrants' Walk (1)

    When on 25 March 2020, the Prime Minister of India, Narendra Modi, announced immediate lockdown in the country to stem the spread of Covid 19, without a forewarning, it left millions of migrant workers unemployed and no way of sustaining themselves. While thousands undertook walking on foot, many rushed to the inter-state bus terminals before they too were shut down.

     

    Migrants' Walk (2)

    Thousands of stranded migrant labourers and their families have been making desperate attempts to reach their villages amind the lockdown in India imposed by the Centre and state governments to combat Covid 19. The police in Indore, Madhya Pradesh, found at least 18 workers hiding inside a cement mixer bound from Maharashtra to Lucknow on 2 May 2020.

     

    Waiting for food

    With no forewarning of nation-wide locked as announced on 25 March 2020 amid the Covid 19 pandemic and no relief measures in place, millions of people, especially daily wage and migrant labourers, in India were caught unawares. Extention of the lockdown even while there were talks of relaxation further added to the woes of the people.

    Here one can see people hanging their utensils on railings, while they wait to collect food distributed by volunteers, at Mayur Vihar in Delhi.

    Planting and Fellowship Amid the Pandemic

    Here in Taiwan, social networking has not totally retreated due to social distancing. Many things still move on ... just behind the masks and the precautionary measures.

    These pictures show the day when people came to build the cucumber shed together. This space is more than a farm. It's a public space that provides the healing effects of the collective work of nature and fellowship, especially at this time of pandemic.  

    Covid-19: Reflections from Gao, Mali (1)

    Le Mali à l'instar des autres pays est touché par la pandémie Covid 19. Des mesures sont prises: le lavage des mains au savon, un respect de la distanciation d'au moins un mètre, l'utilisation du gel et un couvre-feu instauré de 21h à 05 h du matin. À Gao, comme partout la population est consciente de ce fléau et certaines organisations ont fermé et d'autres travaillent timidement.
     

    Taking the Migrants Home (1)

    Indian Railways announced operation of more Shramik special trains for evacuating stranded migrant workers, labourers, pilgrims, and students from various parts of the country from May 4. The decision came after the Union Ministry of Home Affairs issued guidelines for the movement of these groups of people on May 1, 2020... a decision that gave some glimmer of hope to the thousands of stranded migrant labourers across the country after the lockdown was announced on 23 March 2020. 

     

    Taking the Migrants Home (2)

    Shramik Special trains were started to take home lakhs of stranded migrant labourers and their families to their hometown. Many of them have run of out of money and food because of the restrictions imposed to combat the Covid 19. The relief mesaures have been ill planned. Those coming from Surat in Gujarat have alleged that they were charged Rs 800 against a ticket with a printed cost of Rs 630. The labourers said they had no choice but to pay the money if they wanted to return. 

    Taking the Migrants Home (3)

    “These are people who have come to work in Bangalore. Once there is employment, normalcy will get established… so why go back then? Those who still want to go back can do so using their own vehicle,” said N Manjunath Prasad, nodal officer for inter-state travel from Karnataka. 

    The CM of Karanataka BS Yediyurappa met prominent builders and real estate firms who reportedly expressed concern over the mass exodus of labourers on 5 May.

    Taking the Migrants Home (4)

    Many migrant labourers and their families have started walking to reach their home towns after the uncertainities of train arrangements and costs. Among them was a group of 20 migrants who undertook the long walk home from Jalna (Maharashtra) to Bhusaval, 157 km apart. The group chose to walk on railway tracks in order to avoid the highway, where they could have been stopped. The group likely assumed that the trains were not running.

    Warding off the virus with Corona Drishti in Chennai, Tamil Nadu

    Floor drawings, especially those made by variously connecting a grid of dots using white rice flour powder or paste, are often seen at the entrance of people's homes in Tamil Nadu. Known as the kolam, these designs are typically executed by women as part of early morning household chores and renewed daily as a recurring motif of everyday life. This kolam depicts the coronavirus as the evil eye that will protect, but equally harm, if not heeded.

    Hunger: "We want rice, we don't want cash!"

    This haiku encapsulates my impression of the debate titled 'Cash or kind transfer? The regional, national and global dimensions of revamping the Public Distribution System' facilitated by Augustin Brutus, a scholar activist (Intercultural Network for Development and Peace) and post-doctoral scholar at IFP, Nithya Joseph, at the Pondicherry workshop.  The participants included Sudha Sundaraman, of the AIDWA (All Democratic Women's Association) and members of the local women's group SAMAM (Samam Makalir Suyasarbu Iyakkam).

    Covid-19: Reflections from Gao, Mali (2)

    La région de Gao au Mali a pris très au sérieux la pandémie covid 19. Toutes les structures sont en campagne de sensibilisation à travers des sketches et des kakemojo. Mais aussi a travers des distributions de gel hydro alcoolique, savon pour se laver les mains et des masques pour se protéger dans des endroits publics. Les structures sont équipées de kit. Le taux de contagion est faible mais des cas sont enregistré. Tout le monde est entrain de fournir l'effort de mettre fin à cette pandémie.

    Suivrons des images en cuise d'illustration.

    The Changes of Value on Time

    The orange-lined text in the figure is a decree which was issued by King Bodawphaya (1782-1819) in Konebaung dynasty. The original text of it has not been found until now. This is an excerpt from the article written by Ms. Nu Nu Kyi who wrote in Saunders Weaving Institute’100 anniversary magazine. In a decree, the lay men from the different regions had to wear pasoe (the nether garment of Myanmar males) by weaving cotton and satin threads only. Moreover, they didn’t allow wearing the turban, nether garment, and shawl which make with gold and silver threads with a fly shuttle loom.

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