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    What Happens When University Students Invest in Community

    Those kids were coming to us in the village where we were sharing knowledge. They were so happy to learn with us. They were playing around when we first went there. 

    When I looked at those kids, I felt that they had very little of health education because they were dirty and didn’t even were footwear or slippers. But when they were running to me,I felt how they loved to learn with us. And I felt that I m a useful person and that I was so impressive to them as an educated person. In other words, I learnt to be a little proud of myself.

    Lining the Slippers: Making a Difference (1)

    When I see their slippers, I feel that they are unsystematic. This is where we begin sharing knowledge with them.

     

    ဒီကလေးလ က ဒီေုမိ ျိုး စည်းကမ်းမရှိဖြစ်လေ ာကို ဖြုဖြင်လြးချင်စိ ်လ ဖြစ်မိ ယ်။ ဥြမာ ဒီေုမိ ျိုး စည်းကမ်းမရှိ ဲ့ အဖြစ်မျိုးကို ဖခားနိုင်ငံဖခားသား စ်လယာက်လယာက်ကသာ ဖမင်သ ားရင် ဖမေ်မာေူမျိုးက ဒီေုမိ ျိုးေား ဆို ာမျိုး

    မဖမင်လစချင်ဘူး။ အဲေုိ အဖမင်ခံရ ာေည်း များခဲ့ပြ။ီ ထြ်ပြီးလ ာ့ မဖြစ်လစချင် လ ာ့ဘူး။ဒါကကီးကိုဖြင်ြစ်ချင် ဲ့စိ ်လ ဖြစ်ော ယ်။ 

    Lining the Slippers: Making a Difference (2)

    I just ask them “does it look good when you see your slippers messy?”

    They said “No”.

    Then, I ask them “how will you solve this problem?”

    They said that they will place their slippers systematically.

    I understand that they can be changed easily if they have good guidelines. I feel that I can change some parts of their life.

    Lining the Slippers: Making a Difference (3)

    When I see this, I feel that they are not that unaware children. We can encourage them, we can teach them and we can cultivate them. But it is funny that every time when I go there I have to remind them to place their slippers systematically.

    But I hope one day this will be become tnatural. Now, most of them have got to the point where they place their slippers systematically. So, I feel that I can do it. I can improve some parts of their life.

    Brainstorming the Impact of Urban Life: Classroom Discussions

    In the class, I asked my students that “how does the increasing degree of urbanization change the next generation’s view on localized cultural identity? And how should we as anthropologists collaborate with the community?”

    In the class, I discussed on the concept of urban life and then I asked the students to think about the ways in which they all could engage with Taungthaman Village to understand the impact of urban life.

    Re-seizing the Naga Narrative

    Dr. Akum Longchari is the editor of The Morung Express and has been involved with the people's movements in the areas of human rights, justice, peace, and reconciliation. He also engages actively with the Forum for Naga Reconciliation and is associated with the online community journal, the Naga Republic. 

    The following is an excerpt from a conversation with Dr Rakhee Kalita Moral.

    Voices from the Outside

    Dr Imsuchila Kichu is an Assistant Professor of English at Cotton University, Assam. The following is an excerpt from a piece penned by her reflecting upon Naga women and society from the perspective of an insider who has lived away from her community.

    Rise Naga Women

    This song "Rise, Naga Woman" composed by Theyiesinuo Keditsu, music by Khyochano TCK and Topeni as soloist,  was chosen as the winner for the ‘State Theme Song for Women’ and was released by the State Resource Centre for Women (SRCW) under the aegis of the Nagaland State Social Welfare Board (NSSWB) during a program organised to observe the International Day for the elimination of violence against women.

    The song speaks to Naga women and asks them to spread their wings and rise up against discrimination and inspire all of Nagaland and take them to a glorious future.

    Naga Women's Freedom (1)

    Field of Baby's Breath

    I wish I could wear 
    a pretty Pale Pink
    ankle-length Calico dress
    with frills, flounces and lace,
    break out of the mould
    abandon the stereotypes
    and get into my working clothes

    Our brothers are a war
    Our land is awash with blood
    Our rice fields need tending
    Our children caring
    Our sick healing
    Our streets cleaning
    Our enterprises running
    Our home fires burning

    Street Food in Dakar & Suburbs (2): Makeshift Eating Squares

    “It seemed that the whole city had turned into a huge market.”

    On every street corner various food outlets compete for customers with other types of businesses. Most places have very rudimentary facilities.

    "Some have simple tables set out in the open, others stay in the sun while others, like breakfast sellers, join sheets together to make a sort of voting booth in a corner of the street"

    Street Food in Dakar & Suburbs (4): The Construction

    On every street corner, too, various street food outlets compete for customers with other types of businesses. These places are either "canteens" or garages of houses transformed into catering spaces with a large table and wooden benches around for customers, or metal or wooden kiosks glued to a wall or by the roadside.

    The materials used are numerous: stainless steel or plastic or glass containers, spoons, dishes, a gas bottle or coal furnace, plastic basins for laundry, a few 20-litre oil cans recycled into water reserves and a stack of newspaper used as packaging.

    Street Food in Dakar & Suburbs (1): New Eating Habits

    Depending on the time of day, meals with varied menus are served to this very diverse clientele. For breakfast, for example, the saleswomen have bowls on a table, each containing a sauce to make a sandwich, at the customer's discretion, on site or to take away, wrapped in newspaper:

    "Arame provides its customers with three long benches. On his table are bowls containing mayonnaise, tuna, pea sauce, spaghetti, French fries, canned meat, ndambé etc. It adds seasonings and spices (chilli, pepper, broth) to foods to suit the taste of customers.

    Disappearing Rice Varieties

    The rice in the photo is known as "Namar catsa" or " Caca". It looks strange from its name to its colour. According to the farmers, the rice used to be eaten by the Kings and the senior citizens because it is nutritious. The interviewee shared, "it made up complete balanced nutrition for the sick or weak. But now most of our people don't have much knowledge concerning with that kind of paddy ( including me). Today that kind of rice is not grown widely".

    Tracking the Town: Railway Narratives

    Pipariya, as pointed by a number of early settlers of the town, shares its’ initial history with a section of railway line that was laid out during the colonial rule to connect the cities of Bombay (present-day Mumbai) and Calcutta (present-day Kolkata).

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