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    Disappearing Aura

    Simi Mariya Thomas, Research Scholar, MIDS, re-imagined an article circulated as pre-workshop reading in context of her work for the session Reading/Writing/Re-writing/Telling/Re-telling using prompts, 20 December 2019.

    The temporary aura of Kannagi statue, in Chennai, which was visible during its installation as well as disappearance made me think about the current media culture.

    Different? Not really

    The two women are as different as chalk and cheese. And I don't mean in terms of skin colour alone. Their appearance distinctly identifies them from two different regions of India - Northeast and South. They speak different languages and cook and eat food vastly different. But they are one - as women, as mothers as sisters in arms. They are united in their strength in the face of adversity. Migration, resettlement and subsistence bring them together in this space. Each is invisible, marginalised and discriminated against - be it colour, caste or communal identity.

    The emerald green scarf

    Vinitha Jayaprakasan, Research Assistant, Centre for Community Knowledge, Ambedkar University Delhi wrote The Emerald Green Scarf as part of the workshop session on Reading/Writing/Re-writing/Telling/Re-telling using prompts, 20 December 2019.

    Who am I?

    Cheryl Jacob, Coordinator (content & curriculum design) wrote Who am I? for the session on Day 2:Reading/Writing/Re-writing/Telling/Re-telling using prompts, 20 December 2019.

    Who am I? I am free. I am free to flow, free in nature. I take the state that nature gives me. In your hands I am turned into something that nature, perhaps, did not intended me for. But then who knows.

    The blue belt

    Surajit Sarkar, Centre for Community Knowledge, Ambedkar University Delhi wrote The blue belt for the session on Day 2: Reading/Writing/Re-writing/Telling/Re-telling using prompts, 20 December 2019.

    Reading ‘Recipes for Re-enchantment’ allowed a reinterpretation of my ‘Blue Canvas Belt’, which I bought last month after waiting for something like it since 2015.

    Dust

    Nini Lungalang is an important voice in Naga poetry. She taught English and classical music in Northfield School, Kohima, Nagaland. In the poem Dust, she voices the experiences of numerous Naga brothers and sisters who have lost their lives. 

    Photographs as memory triggers

    Photographs have proven to be interesting tools to get people to open up about themselves and share memories of their past. For instance, the photo of Anwar posing at Phasi Ghar (execution point) not only got him talking about the monument that no longer stands, but also reminded him of his childhood spent dressing up and posing for photographs at various locations in Mehrauli, Delhi.

    Mesha Murali: Bus stand se aage. Kahan?  

    Getting ready for School?

    Aarti Kawlra selected a photograph from the exhibition, Ambedkar Nagar- Near Kakkan Bridge, Chennai, to write her story for the session on Reading/Writing/Re-writing/Telling/Re-telling using prompts,  20 December 2019.

    Cloth as vehicle of Malian crisis

    This large cotton boubou, well sewn, shows one of the designs that reflect the Malian crisis. The product comes from Douentza (located in the 5th region of Mali). The elements seen on the boubou illustrate the proliferation of the crisis. Each element is in the form of a hook and the two small dashes from top to bottom to show the continuation of the chain. The arrangement of the design forms a chain of problems.

    Dyeing thread

    The locals did not dye before 1988 because the cooperative department gave out the ready-made dyed threads. But later on they permitted the private businesses to undertake dyeing. They dye yarn for themselves as well as for sale.

    There are two kinds of dyes: natural and chemical; and two types of dyeing techniques: hot dyeing and cool dyeing. For the dyeing process, warm or hot water, cold water, glue-liquid, dye and glove are required. The dyeing process follows the cycle of cleaning (purifying), dyeing, wringing, shaking off, and putting out to dry.

    U Pein Bridge: Learning history through childhood poem

    This oral narrative was collected by the students exploring the word concept - belief. 

    The seventy-two year old father of the fried-fish seller told us the following story related with the establishment of the U Pein bridge:

    "I left the monastery long time ago but I remember what I learnt about the history of the U Pein bridge"

     

    အင်းကအော်ညီး ဆောက်လုပ်ပြီး၊ ဉီးပိန် တံတားကြီး

    အင်း၀ရေငံ တွင်းဂျီးစော်နံ၊ တောင်သမန် ရေချိုတွင်း သောက်ပါလေ့ ကို ရန်ကင်း ဘေးရန်က ရှင်း

    ဘရူရာဇာ (ထန်းပင်) မည်သော ထန်းပဒေသာပင်များ ခြံရံလျက်ရှိသောနေရာများကို ရွေးချယ်ခဲ့သည်။

    Learning while walking in the forest: Where the village practices shifting cultivation

    Every day, the youth of Huay Hin Lad Nai community go into the forest to find food. The forest serves as the local supermarket. Accompanying them into the forest today are students from Chiang Mai University, who are part of school's Ethnic Studies and Development program. Both the students and the youth group woke up early at 5:00 a.m to go and learn in the forest together. The local youth shared stories about shifting cultivation, properties of variety of vegetables and herbs, and their way of living with the forest and nature.

    Luntaya acheik: Then and now

    The weaving of luntaya acheik  or the wavy rope pattern created through the use of hundred shuttles loom and silk thread, is mainly based on seven elementary designs and thirty-three ropes. In the Konbaung period (1752 to 1885), it was a royal fabric that only the kings, queens and high officials were allowed to wear. Now everyone can wear luntaya acheik. People wear this luntaya acheik for special ceremonies like novitiation, wedding, state level events, and convocation. It is a valuable fabric.

    Battling Covid 19 with thalis

    The sounds in the audio may resemble expressions of jubilation - a win in a game perhaps. But these aren't meant to be. Inspired by Italy, the PM of India, Mr N. Modi, in national telecast called upon Indians to bang thalis or utensil or clap for five minutes at 5:00 pm from their balconies, windows or outside their own doors as part of the Janta Curfew on 22 March 2020. The gesture was in part to show appreciation to the first responders. While it may have been meant to be encouraging. Some people burst fire crakcers.

    Learning to be an anthropologist 1

    This was the first field trip for us and there were many new experiences for us. All of us as first-year anthropology students had never experienced this kind of field trip; and we asked ourselves, ‘What are we going to do?’ We motivated ourselves by asking the question, ‘If we are afraid to ask questions, we will know nothing’.

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