Practice

Street food in Dakar & suburbs 4: the construction

On every street corner, too, various street food outlets compete for customers with other types of businesses. These places are either "canteens" or garages of houses transformed into catering spaces with a large table and wooden benches around for customers, or metal or wooden kiosks glued to a wall or by the roadside.

The materials used are numerous: stainless steel or plastic or glass containers, spoons, dishes, a gas bottle or coal furnace, plastic basins for laundry, a few 20-litre oil cans recycled into water reserves and a stack of newspaper used as packaging.

Dyeing Thread

The locals did not dye before1988 because the cooperative department gave out the ready-made dyed threads. In later years, they permitted the private businesses to undertake dyeing. They dye yarn for themselves as well as for sale.

There are two kinds of dyes: natural and chemical. There are two types of dyeing techniques: hot dyeing and cool dyeing. For dyeing process, warm or hot water, cold water, glue-liquid, dye and glove are required. The dyeing process follows the cycle of cleaning (purifying), dyeing, wringing, shaking off, and putting out to dry.

Cloth as vehicle of Malian crisis

This large cotton boubou, well sewn, shows one of the designs that reflect the Malian crisis. The product comes from Douentza (located in the 5th region of Mali). The elements seen on the boubou illustrate the proliferation of the crisis. The arrangement of the designs forms a chain of problems. Each element is in the form of a hook and the two small dashes from top to bottom show the continuation of the chain.

The blue belt

Surajit Sarkar, Centre for Community Knowledge, Ambedkar University Delhi wrote The blue belt for the session on Day 2: Reading/Writing/Re-writing/Telling/Re-telling using prompts, 20 December 2019.

Reading ‘Recipes for Re-enchantment’ allowed a reinterpretation of my ‘Blue Canvas Belt’, which I bought last month after waiting for something like it since 2015.

Imaginations of a street

Mesha Murali, Senior Research Assistant, Centre for Community Knowledge, Ambedkar University Delhi, for her story took inspiration from all the exhibited photos for the session on Reading/Writing/Re-writing/Telling/Re-telling using prompts, 20 December 2019.

I saw people sitting on the street, outside their houses, talking, eating and enjoying the passing day. Children were playing games, laughing, dancing to music and being asked by their parents to stay at a safe distance from the main street.

Who am I?

Cheryl Jacob, Coordinator (content & curriculum design) wrote Who am I? for the session on Day 2:Reading/Writing/Re-writing/Telling/Re-telling using prompts, 20 December 2019.

Who am I? I am free. I am free to flow, free in nature. I take the state that nature gives me. In your hands I am turned into something that nature, perhaps, did not intended me for. But then who knows.

Disappearing Aura

Simi Mariya Thomas, Research Scholar, MIDS, re-imagined an article circulated as pre-workshop reading in context of her work for the session Reading/Writing/Re-writing/Telling/Re-telling using prompts, 20 December 2019.

The temporary aura of Kannagi statue, in Chennai, which was visible during its installation as well as disappearance made me think about the current media culture.

Cycling shades of Chennai

Simi Mariya Thomas, Research Scholar, MIDS, selected a photograph from the exhibition, Ambedkar Nagar- Near Kakkan Bridge, Chennai, to write her story for the session on Reading/Writing/Re-writing/Telling/Re-telling using prompts, 20 December 2019.

Superwomen of Chennai always surprise and excite me. They design their life in a manner in which they are fully involved into some sort of activities around the clock.

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