craft and community

Weaving Luntaya Acheik Then and Now: The Making of Myanmar Traditional Dress

It is the further findings of the author U Shwe Htun's Lunyakyaw Kyogyi Acheik . He discusses the various patterns which have been continuously woven from Innwa period to until now. Although the fabric in the late Colony period was the full breadth and width cloth with sparseless designs, they change to wear the sparse designs now. The three types of acheik ( mulamuhman kyogyi acheik to khitthit kyogyi acheik and fashion kyogyi acheik) are innovated to weave step by step. The first occurred mulamuhman kyogyi acheik is not now woven anywhere in Myanmar.

Weaving Luntaya Acheik Then and Now: The Making of Myanmar Traditional Dress

The Saunders Weaving and Vocational Institute accept the trainees by per year/per month. There is regular training as well as other vocational training. Moreover, this institute learn the requirement of training school if the local organizations make the request according to the requirements of their organization.

Weaving Luntaya Acheik Then and Now: The Making of Myanmar Traditional Dress

The first figure a governors Myanmar awarded it by honouring. It was the sacred clothe of ancient Myanmar king. This fabric can wear only royal family.

It was colonial dress. During this period, everyone can wear this acheik.

To Know Myanmar people, they conduct by using by media, advertisement, etc. It becomes national costume.

In current situation to wear everyone, they produce three types. This is over 100 shuttle looms, under 100 shuttle looms and 100 shuttle looms as well as silk, silk-satin and satin-nylon.

Indigo as Pedagogy

Starting 2012, the TNUA Centre for Traditional Arts (CTA) initiated a series of field courses, including indigenous boat making, bark cloth making, banana fiber crafts, ritual parades etc.; the course of ‘Natural Dyeing’ was one of them. These courses aimed to bring students out of the classroom to learn from the soil and different people who give life to traditional arts, and to learn how traditional arts are related to the society and their generation. The 2013 course of ‘Natural Dyeing’, conducted with many partners, was divided into three main stages.

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